Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Hazel Tubeling Availability Update

We still have thousands of Badgersett Standard hazel tubelings available for this season, and we might have specific machine-picked types left (depending on the actual viability of years-stored seed, which varies).  We are essentially SOLD OUT of all other types of hazel tubelings for 2015.
If you place an order with one of our many other tubeling types, and allow substitutions: we will get as close to your desires as we can, and in some cases may still be able to fill the order as you desire.

Orders with "no substitutions" for anything other than Standard and Machine Picked will have to wait for 2016 at this point.

Planting is in full swing in the greenhouse, and we've got thousands of hazels soaking up today's sunshine!

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Badgersett computers off-line;


Yesterday; and today- and likely for a few more; email contact with Badgersett will be a bit chancy; we're doing a major server and individual computers software update-

Back as son as we can; and who knows, maybe functioning a bit faster.  Wouldn't that be great?

:-)

Sunday, October 19, 2014

The price of peanuts in China—


When you're thinking about neohybrid hazels as a "crop"; it's a really good idea to starting learning about nut crops around the world.  At the moment; what happens to one crop, anywhere, is likely to affect almost all other nut crops, everywhere.  A good example; the peanut crop in China may be the lowest on record- due to drought in the interior.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/english/news/features/201410161322.html

It's also good to see, and learn, what an "industry" is--

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

2014 Key Hickory Data to Be Collected

Hurrah!  We are anticipating a bumper crop from the hybrid hickory-pecan (a.k.a hickories)plantings... both the one near the picnic area and on the back hill.  Data from this crop will be the first of multiple years of data collection that will enable us to make well-informed decisions for our first selection cycle in this "crop-in-the-making". As with the hazels and chestnuts, we need to have baseline data as we begin/continue the process of crop domestication. 

Because of the bountiful harvest and the need for attention to detail, we are in serious need of additional staffing, (volunteers), who would be interested in being part of this substantial effort.  I am changing  my schedule for the next 4 to 6 weeks to work Sundays from 10 to 5 or so collecting, husking and collecting data from the hickories. The one exception is October 12th, when I will be showcasing my Babydoll lambs on a regional Sheep and Fiber Farm Tour.

For individuals interested in obtaining credit for future Badgersett plant purchases (not restricted to hickories), our arrangement is this: the first day is considered training = no credit given.  After the first day, credit will be given at a rate of $10/hour.

Overnight option: For those who may be interested, campsites and water can be made available should you wish to stay here the night before or after the day worked (or both). There is also an Amish B&B that may be of interest to you that is very near by. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Amish-Country-BB/215884968457720

PLEASE let me know if you are coming so I can plan accordingly.  During harvest season there are many competing demands and I may be putting out fires elsewhere if I don't know you are arriving.  I plan to make the trip worthwhile for anyone interested in working with me on this fascinating, multi-purpose crop. swiegrefe@sbcglobal.net

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Permaculture Voices Podcasts

After speaking at the Permaculture Voices conference last March near San Diego, Philip met online with the organizer Diego Footer to record a podcast episode. As is often the case in interviews with him, it went a bit over! Diego turned it into two, and they are available at
http://www.permaculturevoices.com/57
http://www.permaculturevoices.com/58

Go ahead and scroll down on one of those pages; there are a bunch of linked articles and videos, some of which could be new to you.

From the introduction:

"This interview is with Phil Rutter of Badgersett Research Corporation. We talk about why perennial based woody agriculture is important and how chestnuts and hazelnuts fit into that system. We also talk a lot about plant breeding using mass selection to find genotypes of plants that have the traits that you are looking for. This episode is pretty dense and has a ton of information in it for anyone looking to breed plants. Phil is brilliant and I think I learned more about plant breeding in my conversations with him than I ever have anywhere else. Given how much information is in this podcast and how long this podcast is, I have split it into two parts. This is part one, with the second part coming in episode 58.

Take it all in, enjoy it, and most importantly do something with this information."